This Sunday @ UUFR (11:00 am)

Forgiveness

Rev. Dr. Justin Osterman

Our Stories. Our Voices.

The first time I heard about Unitarianism was while studying for a Master’s degree in English. I was taking a class on Emerson, Whitman and Thoreau – a sort of Unitarian trinity. It was the essays of Emerson that had the most impact on my religious and spiritual life, and eventually led me to the doors of UUFR. Read the full testimonial.

I first came to UUFR in the summer of 1998. I’d just moved to Raleigh, didn’t know anyone here, except Don, my (now) husband. I was raised in a UU church in NY and, after a hiatus, felt ready to re-engage with a spiritual community. Read the full testimonial.

UUFR is the place where I nurture so much of what’s good in my life: my meditation practice at the Monday night mindfulness group, my desire to serve my community at LEAP and at our monthly Interfaith Food Shuttle project, my writing practice at the Wednesday night writing group, my social activism on the UUFR Acts! Facebook page. And last but not least, it’s in this sanctuary that I am often filled up with the knowledge that life can be hard and beautiful at once, and that I am not alone on this journey. Read the full testimonial.

Being a Unitarian Universalist doesn’t work for everyone. There’s no group-wide theology to hold tightly to, no threat of damnation or promise of heaven, only what UU theologian Rebecca Parker calls “freely chosen and life-sustaining interdependence.” Read the full testimonial.

UUFR is a place where I can raise my children in a faith that affirms the worth and dignity of every person regardless of skin color, religion or sexual orientation.

Read the full testimonial.